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for a penniless u.s. grows more compelling, giving ex-congressman kolbe hope. >> the polling is very clear that when people find out about the savings they're going to make it's substantial and willing to make that kind of change. >> according to him, not minting pennies would save the u.s. treasury about $45 million a year. and while we're on the subject, switching the paper dollar to a dollar coin would save $178 a year and a nickel now costs a dime to produce. quarter for your thoughts? thanks for watching "state of the union." i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.com/sotu for analysis and extras. and if you missed any part of today's show, find us on itunes. search "state of the union." "fareed zakaria: gps" is next. >>> this is "gps," the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a great show for you today and we begin with american politics. what is really happening? are the republicans on the defensive? will the automatic budget cuts happen? is there any chance of legislative deals? we have a great pane
for the u.s. senate. he was running against the governor in his own party. so, it was kind of a, you know, insurgent upstart approach to have the temerity to actually think that he could knock off the governor, which he, obviously, did for the nomination and won. >> despite the similarities, allen has a clear preference. his book jacket notes, the reason you like sports more than politics is because sports makes sense and washington doesn't. okay, now, are you ready for some football? thank you so much for watching "state of the union." i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.com/sotu. for analysis and extras if you missed any part of today's show find us on itunes, search "state of the union." fareed zakaria is next for our viewers here in the united states. >>> this is "gps, the global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have two famous and fascinating guests for you today. first, the world's second wealthiest man, bill gates. despite the weak economy, despite the strife in molly, syria, else where, despite massacr
. mort zuckerman, publisher of u.s. news and world report, publisher of "the daily news" and he has a few real estate holdings here and there. arianna huffington, chair, president, and editor in chief of "the huffington post" media group. and ed connor, visiting scholar at the american enterprise institute, former managing director at bane capital. arianna, do you think that the obama you're seeing now -- and one of the things i'm struck by is how the election changed the political climate. # the republicans seem on the defensive, trying to reinvent the plan. obama seems more confident. is this the new obama? is this the old obama? is this the real obama? >> well, the great thing for obama right now is that he has the public on his side. my concern right now -- and that's, i think, will determine which obama will actually prevail -- is that jobs and growth are not on his agenda. it is absolutely stunning. if you go back to the election, he kept campaigning around jobs, rebuilding our bridges, rebuilding our infrastructure, the american dream, saving it for the middle class. and both the r
particularly in the u.s. has always found its way there. now, running a government with a two-month budget, you know, try to run a business. try to hire people and try to do capital spending and try to figure out how you're going to use innovation. it's -- no matter what you think about what the government wants it to be, doing it the way we're doing it is absolutely insane. terribly inefficient. every bad thing you can say about government gets worse when it's on the short term, unknown future processes. >> on the big public policy issue of the day, we should involve economic policy and i'm asking you this because you found it and ran for many years the largest company in the world. the issue is, do we need to get the fiscal house in order with a long-term budget deal and would that trigger a kind of avalanche of business investment? is that what is holding businesses back? >> certainly the uncertainty that we haven't reached compromises on these things, that can't be good. it's got to make business hold back. the fact that the investments in the future may be cut back, that's a little bit sca
point to a different reality. economic mobility in the u.s. is low compared to what it was in times past and with current levels in many european countries in canada. you hear all about rags to riches stories, but they are the exceptions. a comprehensive study by the pew economic mobility documents that in the u.s. today few poor people become even upper middle class. now, some of the criticism of president obama's program has come from people who worry about the government's track record in the area of early childhood education. they point to head start, the long-standing program that provides this education to disadvantaged children. the department of health and human services released a study of head start in 2010 which was updated in 2012 that positive effects begin to fade in a few years. this has led many to call the program a failure and urged the government not to throw good money after bad. people are jumping to conclusions about a very complicated subject without understanding the study or social science research. three scholars from the university of chicago and university of
with the u.s. government not paying interest on its debt, then god knows what would have happened. this is not like that. this is something where the negative effects kick in gradually. the world won't end if we go a month into this thing, so he can afford to wait, where i believe the republicans will have to cave eventually. what he should be looking for is i think some face-saving way for everybody to just kick this can down the road. we could have some vague spending cuts promised in the future, some real revenue sources. >> all in the future. >> all in the future. this is a terrible time to do us a terry. >> i think his reaction depends on whether or not the republicans can hold their coalition together. and if they can create a coalition that holds together, which might even include some democrats, i think they can prevail on this issue and get a small amount of cost reduction. i think if they shy away from -- >> do you want to see some us a terry now? >> they have to demonstrate some ability to manage the costs over the long run if you want to see the private sector grow as
, but will place a band aid on america's growing cancer of failing intrastructure. a 2009 study of u.s. infrastructure by the american society of civil engineers concluded that we need $2.2 trillion to be spent over five years to bring the nation's roads, bridges, railway tracks, airports and associated systems up to grade. let me make three crucial points. first, this is the big bang. it would be the most effective way to create good jobs. unemployment in the construction industry is among the nation's highest. around 16%. the private sector is still not investing much in construction. second, it's cheap. the federal government's borrowing costs today are lower than they are ever likely to be, again. deferring maintenance is not fiscal prudence. when your boiler explodes, it costs more than it would had you just spent the money keeping it in good functioning order. we need to spend that money now. third, this is an area where the federal government has always had a big role, one that republicans have long embraced. in 1930, even as herbert hoover was trying to balance the federal budg
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)